Best tunes of 1992: #11 Pure “Spiritual pollution”

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Well, it’s Canada day again, albeit one the likes of which we’ve never seen before. And hopefully, we’ll never see again.

I’ve saved this particular post for today because the band in question is a lesser known and perhaps, not as well remembered Canadian alternative rock band from the  90s. Pure were one of the few Canadian acts that I listened to around that time and it was likely because their sound was similar to the Madchester hooks with which I had been obsessed. As you may recall, I’ve already made mention on these pages that my tastes tended to British music in the early 1990s. American alternative rock had turned its ears to Seattle and Canadian bands were following suit,

Pure, though, were a four-piece from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada that formed in 1991. The original members comprised of drummer Leigh Grant, bassist Dave Hadley, guitarist Todd Simko, and vocalist Jody Birch. They got their first taste of success when one of their tracks appeared on the soundtrack for “Cool world”, a half animated/half live-action film that featured a young Brad Pitt. Then, their debut album, “Pureafunalia”, was released in 1992 and it’s first single, “Blast”, hit the airwaves and music video channels and thus, caught my attention. That track was just shy of making it on to this very list but there was no way “Spiritual pollution” wouldn’t be included. Sure, it wasn’t released as a single until the following year but I was already hooked on it from listening to that debut album in 1992.

A dirty and cool guitar riff opens the proceedings, putting a strut in your step and a feather in your cap. And then: Bah dah da-da-da-dah, duh duh duh da-dah… oh, the glorious horns. The beat pops and cracks in, sounding like robotic handclaps, the synth bass washes, and then, that guitar riff and the horn flourishes return for more fanfare. And over top it all, frontman Jody Birch is just cool, laying it all just there, a hepcat, not needing our spiritual pollution. No, not at all.

That debut album mixed dancefloor grooves with 60s psychedelic guitar rock but later on, their sound tended to be more pedestrian, and though I enjoyed their sophomore release, 1994’s “Generation six pack”. My love affair with the band started to fizzle from there. But we’ll always have the horns of “Spiritual pollution”. I could listen to and hum that riff all day long… Especially on this odd Canada day…

For the rest of the Best tunes of 1992 list, click here.

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