Vinyl love: The National “Boxer”

(Vinyl Love is a series of posts that quite simply lists, describes, and displays the pieces in my growing vinyl collection. You can bet that each record was given a spin during the drafting of each corresponding post.)

Artist: The National
Album Title: Boxer
Year released: 2007
Year reissued: 2011
Details: yellow

The skinny: The last post in this series featured the just purchased brand new album by The National, “I am easy to find”, and it’s been on regular rotation on the turntable ever since. The American alternative rock band has consistently put out excellent records, at least since I picked up on them. And the record that started it off for me was this one, “Boxer”, an album I ranked at number four for 2007 when I counted down that year’s best album many months ago now. In that same post, I talked about how I fed an MP3 version of the album through my stereo so that I could record it to cassette tape in order to listen to it in my car. Good times. Now I just spin it on my turntable in pretty pretty yellow.

Standout track: “Mistaken for strangers”

Vinyl love: Stars “In our bedroom after the war”

(Vinyl Love is a series of posts that quite simply lists, describes, and displays the pieces in my growing vinyl collection. You can bet that each record was given a spin during the drafting of each corresponding post.)

Artist: Stars
Album Title: In our bedroom after the war
Year released: 2007
Details: Black vinyl, 2 x 180 gram

The skinny: After the brilliance of their third record, “Set yourself on fire“, I was firmly set among those wildly anticipating the next record. Canadian indie popsters Stars released “In our bedroom after the war” to digital stores the day after it was completed in an attempt to foil the leakers and pirates and then was issued physically two months later. If there was to be a complaint to be made about this fourth record, it would only be that it didn’t venture too far afield from the template of its predecessor… but I wouldn’t call that a bad thing. It is more ornate and literate chamber pop, calling to mind The Smiths and The Beautiful South, but perhaps slightly more slanted towards the dancefloor.

Standout track: “Take me to the riot”